Coeur de Pirate update

Mark Sullivan has been following Béatrice Martin’s growing confidence this year, as her third album is awaited.
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When Béatrice Martin told us a year ago that she was making a new, bilingual album, it was likely that 2015 would be Coeur de Pirate’s year. And so it is proving, even though ‘Roses’ is not out until 28 August. She has already achieved a ‘double first’ – the first single to be issued contemporaneously in two language versions, and the first video in which the star performs a modern dance with a professional ballet dancer. It has been followed by revelation on stage of Béatrice’s new English-language songs. To come are festival appearances this summer, and a major tour both sides of the Atlantic running into 2016.

CdP’s video for ‘Oublie-moi’ / ‘Carry on’ , has reached 1 million hits in French, and over 360,000 in English. The Accès Illimité film of how the dance video was shot, in November 2014 at the atmospheric St Raphael’s Church Ruins, South Glengarry County, Ontario, 60 km west of Montreal, is here.
The choreographer Nico Archambault, and the principal ballet dancer Sam Colbey, are with Les Ballets Canadiens de Montréal. The film while short shows well how Béatrice has outdistanced the general run of pop performers’ videos by learning real modern dance herself, and doing it well. (The second half of the video shows her being taught in the Ballet Company’s studio).

The launch of the single on ‘La Voix’ on 5 April (with parts of ‘Place de la Republique’ and ‘Comme des Enfants’) is here. Béatrice dared to introduce her major new song by having the competitors sing it with her. You cannot imagine anyone else doing that, but it works.

See Beatrice on France’s RTL2 radio show, and then on Virgin Radio.
f you can cope with it, watch her talking for half-an-hour to RFMs impossibly seductive interviewer Sophie Coste!

A live performance of ‘Carry on’ did not however take place for another 6 weeks. Béatrice cleverly chose the CBC Music Festival, at Echo Beach, Toronto on 23 May 2015, to reveal her new English-language songs. Her performance was broadcast live by CBC radio but not available outside Canada then, and we have had to wait (more expectation) until 3 July when good quality film of her and her band made it to the internet. Ron Skinner of CBC Radio 2’s blog about her set is here.

Six songs are now available via the CBC website,or on Youtube as follows:
‘Oceans Brawl’ (the first song)
‘Carry on’ (a new and great backing)
‘I don’t want to break your heart’
‘Our love’
‘Undone’
and the one new song in French so far revealed, and the stand-out performance to my mind:

This isn’t all. Just posted is Béatrice’s Collective Arts Black Box Session, filmed in Toronto in June. It presents a different version of ‘Carry on’, and a song not filmed at Echo Beach, ‘The Way back Home’ – played on keyboard, with a single guitar and backing singer
The quality is excellent and the short interview is classic CdP in English – charming and succinct. As usual every word she says is worth listening to.

Meanwhile, Béatrice has kept her French audiences expectant for this summer’s festivals by turning in a new solo version now on-line of ‘Oublie-moi’ on 3 July at the studio of the newspaper ‘Le Parisien’ and a nice version of her 2010 Victoires de la Musique winner, ‘Comme des enfants’.
The rugby scrum of journalists watching her at RTL’s studio on 6 July, singing ‘Crier tout bas’ with her leading musician Renaud Bastien on acoustic guitar, shows (despite the poor sound) how the press interest in the world’s most talented 25-year-old is as great as ever.

And Béatrice has published a clear photo at last of her daughter Romy (now nearly 3), mimicking her mother with a microphone. It’s on her twitter here.

We may now have most of her new English-language songs. ‘Crier tout bas’ whets the appetite for as-yet-unrevealed ones in French.

Fils Sourire 2

World, meet Malik, ‘fils sourire 2′, held here by his proud big frère.

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To celebrate, here’s Catherine Major:

Mira Choquette

Mira  Choquette ArtworkCool Jazz on a summer’s evening, anyone?

Singer-songwriter and bona fide Montréalaise Mira Choquette has been performing Jazz for as long as she can remember. She has sung with the renowned Montréal Jazz-enemble Claremont Jazz for the past 10 years, as well as lending her disarmingly smooth vocals to artists such as Patrick Watson and has recently released her debut album “Something Cool” that features a round dozen relaxing Jazz standards, including a rather sultry interpretation of Edith Piaf’s “Adieu mon coeur.”

Take a listen below…

Saratoga

20150705 Saratoga Artwork2It’s a well known fact that you can never – ever – own too many records that feature Chantal Archambault. Purveyor of some of the most thoughtful and intelligent – and yes – romantic – country-tinged folk tunes known to man, she has the knack of crafting such delicately constructed songs that you can’t help but get in touch with your feminine side…

Saratoga is the side project of Chantal and her partner Michel-Olivier Gasse (author, musician – the driving force behind Caloon Saloon – and contributor to Chantal’s albums). Named after the famous Spa resort in upstate New York where the pair first decided to form a duet, their eponymous EP consists of five intimate and seemingly effortless folk-tinged numbers that are full of timeless melodies, thoughtful, intelligent lyrics and the most note perfect vocal harmonies.

The tracks that top and tail this EP truly stand-out. “Saratoga”, clean and stripped-back, just acoustic guitar, double-bass and crystal clear yet heart-warming vocals matched to a honey-dripped melody and lilting refrain. “Oublie Pas” is probably the best example of the delicate vocal harmonies and complex lyrical arrangements that the pair create.

And while it is fair to say that at times the songs on this album are imprinted with Chantal’s DNA this EP is far more than a collection of Chantal Archambault songs. “Les bourgeons pis le gazon” – apparently the first song that someone ever wrote for Chantal – and “Madame Rosa”, a Saloon Caloon composition both lead with Michel’s vocals with Chantal’s vocals adding texture and depth to the sweet harmonies.

Pony

Liking this too, a lot

Gillian Hills, Europe’s first pop star

Gillian Hills was the first girl pop singer in Europe. Mark Sullivan looks at her short but historic career.
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Fifty-five years ago this month, in June 1960, a 16-year old English girl was in a recording studio in Paris. Gillian Hills was the first female singer in Europe to record pop and rock as we know it today. Until 1960, rock & roll and other styles such as skiffle were all-male. Even in the USA there were few female pop singers in the Fifties, Brenda Lee being the best-known.
At the time that Cliff Richard was the top British star in 1958-60, the ‘New Musical Express’ readers were voting for the old-style Alma Cogan as ‘Outstanding British Female Singer’ each year. In France, singers were either in the chanson tradition (Piaf, Juliette Gréco, Barbara) or ‘Variétés’ (Line Renaud).
Johnny Hallyday has explained in this interview how he was the first rock singer in France. Gillian Hills is his female equivalent.

Gillian Hills has an exotic parentage. Her father was Denis Hills, a British adventurer and soldier with a dramatic life, as his 2004 obituary shows.
Her mother, Danila, was the daughter of Boleslaw Lesmian, a leading Polish poet (1877-1937) and part of the pre-1939 Polish intelligentsia. They escaped from Poland to the Middle East. Gillian Hills was born in Cairo on 5 June 1944 while her father was fighting in the Italian campaign. The marriage didn’t last and her mother moved with her to France. In 1958 she was attending a lycée in Nice, as the only ‘anglaise’. As the photo on her own website under ‘Bio’ shows, she looked then nearer 20 than 14 and was successfully modelling herself on Brigitte Bardot. She auditioned for and was picked by Roger Vadim for the role of Cecile de Volanges in a modern-day version of ‘Les Liaisons Dangereuses’.
The tabloid-press publicity led Vadim to cast her only in a smaller part, but the school regarded her as a dangerous influence and asked her to leave! She never attended school again, and in 1959 she was cast as the teenage lead in the first British rock-and-roll film, ‘Beat Girl’ alongside Adam Faith, then 18. She is prominent in the opening credits here and writes about it on her website Gillianhills.com – click on ‘Film’.

Bilingual, Gillian Hills was picked up not by a UK record company, but by the French producer Eddie Barclay. She made her first singles in 1960, starting with ‘Cha-cha stop’.
Her best early song, the recording that she is most proud of (it plays over her website) http://www.gillianhills.com is ‘Zou bisou bisou’ (1961).

The éclat of her appearance on the scene is shown in the films of her performances, which were mostly of versions of American songs. An excellent example is ‘Qui aurait dit ça’, on TV in April 1962. She reverts to the English ‘Talking about you’ at the end. A very good version is from Italian TV here.
Her website Gillianhills.com under ‘Music’ has links to her best songs, with her recollections of Eddie Barclay, Daniel Filipacci and Johnny Hallyday. She is the only Briton who worked with them all, so these are unique.

Gillian Hills’s dominance of the new pop in France did not last long. In 1961, Filipacci found a new, French, star, Sylvie Vartan, whose rise to fame is described on this blog on her 70th birthday in August 2014.
Sylvie was very similar to Gillian – blonde and good at the twist – but she followed the new American casual dress adopted by Jean Seberg in ‘A bout de souffle’ (cropped hair and slacks), not that of Bardot. And then in Autumn 1962 Françoise Hardy entered the scene, with both a music that brought together chanson and Anglophone influences, and a whole new look. Françoise pushed out the Bardot late-Fifties style that Gillian Hills had developed for herself.
Gillian did well for a bit longer: see her duet with Serge Gainsbourg in 1963, ‘Une petite tasse d’anxiété’.

‘Avec toi’, also 1963, shows her in classic yé-yé style, the clarity of her words for us Anglophones reflecting her partly English upbringing.

In 1965 showed that she could draw on the new British pop sound with ‘Rien n’est changé’ and perhaps her best song of all, ‘Rentre sans moi’. She created this from the Zombies classic ‘Leave me be’ (the original is here).

But yé-yé was now a crowded field. She probably lost out by not being in Daniel Filipacci’s ‘Salut les Copains’ stable of artists. She sought to enter the British pop scene. However, it was already dominated by well-known stars – Helen Shapiro, Cilla Black, Dusty Springfield and others left little room. Gillian Hills made just one single, with an almost-perfect self-penned song in English, ‘Tomorrow is another day’ (1965).

At just 21, she closed her pop career and turned to films full-time. Her best-known part is as one of the two girls in the famous ‘fight scene’ with David Hemmings in Antonioni’s ‘Blow Up’ made in 1966. The other girl was of course Jane Birkin. Unfortunately the blonde Gillian was made to go brunette for the film, so she was barely recognisable among the galaxy of stars in that cult production.
Gillian Hills also had a cameo part in Stanley Kubrick’s ‘A Clockwork Orange’ (1971), which she discusses here.
The film was withdrawn for many years by Kubrick because of criticism of its violence. She had parts in TV series and other films but was never well-known in Britain and retired in 1975. She married Stewart Thomas, who has managed several bands (including AC/DC, Emerson Lake & Palmer, and Foreigner), so remains connected to the music industry. She turned for a professional career to using her artistic skills as a book illustrator.
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When the American TV series ‘Mad Men’ featured ‘Zou bisou bisou’ in its fifth series in 2012, Gillian Hills was briefly in the media as the first to record it. The ‘Daily Mail’ said that she had been a ‘teen Bardot lookalike’.
Jessica Paré’s rather famous interpretation is here and her recorded track is here.

Gillian Hills’s short, mercurial career and the fact that it was divided between two countries and languages mean that that she is almost forgotten today. The 2004 obituaries of her father say nothing at all about his more famous daughter. Yet the songs and film clips offered here show that she deserves a place in British and French social history of the late Fifties and Sixties. And perhaps ‘Tomorrow is another day’ deserves a new interpretation. Could Coeur de Pirate, who like Gillian is blond, bilingual and does not sound the same in English as in French (to quote Béatrice Martin herself) revive some Gillian Hills songs? She’s a musician of today who could do justice to the legacy of one of the world’s first pop stars.

A Gillian Hills Discography is here.

RIP Magali Noël

Actress and singer Magali Noël has passed away today. She’s mostly known for the song ‘Fais moi mal, Johnny’, written by Boris Vian. Listen to the original HERE, see Magali perform the song below

Magali sang more cool songs, like this one

Fais moi mal, Johnny was covered many, many times. Here are a few examples:

Parfait Été 2015

parfait_2015The all new edition of Parfait Été, the French summer compilation I make every year for Perfects.nl, is here. It has an African pop vibe, triggered by the Mathieu Boogaerts song I heard on FIP radio. Elegant nouvelle chanson with highlife touches, hmmm, interesting. I know a few more songs in that category. Lo and behold, there was the playlist (available on Deezer and Spotify). With known faces (Vanessa Paradis, Boogaerts, Murat) old 80s culthits (thanks Steve for Lizzy MD) and new names – you should really check out the full album by DjeuhDjoah and Lieutenant Nicholson. GO HERE